CDK Global is Eliminating Unencrypted Transmissions

CDK letter explaining the end of Telnet

I was glad to receive the following letter from CDK Global yesterday. Although CDK has taken other steps to protect sensitive data over the years, this is an essential move as is the future-planned move to HTTPS and SFTP.

Security Update: Eliminating Unencrypted Transmissions

Dear Valued Customer,

As we continue to improve security, we’re eliminating unencrypted transmission to and from the DMS. As a next step, we’ll be moving from the Telnet protocol to Secure Shell (SSH). We’ll soon be rolling out updates to all DMS and PC clients to use SSH. And, starting January 1, CDK will begin disabling Telnet for inbound transmissions to the DMS.

How this change will impact your dealership

This change will have no visible impact on dealers that only use CDK software and applications. CDK-certified partner applications will be compliant with the change from Telnet to SSH. However, non-CDK software that interfaces with the DMS may be affected. This includes scripting via terminal emulators such as Reflection, which CDK no longer supports. As a reminder, CDK only supports the use of BlueZone terminal emulator, which is included as a component in our software package.

Look for future communications about eliminating other unencrypted data transmissions, including changes from HTTP to HTTPS, and from FTP to SFTP. As always, we strongly recommend keeping all of your CDK software updated to the most recent versions to ensure you have the latest features and security enhancements.

If you have concerns regarding the January 1, 2017 date for transition to SSH, please contact CDK Support. Thank you for your consideration of this matter as we work to implement more secure transmission methods.

Sincerely,

CDK Global

With the new ETL tools added to Excel 2013 (and 2016), many CDK clients are enjoying the benefits of Business Intelligence (BI). These astute clients of CDK use their data from the DMS to improve the performance of their dealerships.

If your dealership has not made arrangements to move to CDK’s Dealer Data Access (DDA) (previously known as MDA or Managed Data Access), you really should. It is an awesome product for dealers who want to join the data revolution and manage their store using the many new self-service Business Intelligence tools.

If some of you are still using the unattended download features of the Reflections terminal emulator (TE), you will need to migrate to the now supported BlueZone TE (ADP Terminal Emulator 4.1.3.1010.msi). For those of you that have Excel workbooks or Word documents that use Visual Basic for Applications to access the DMS there is the te_vba.msi installer. These are both available in the CDK Software Library on Drive.

I don’t believe that CDK has added the unattended download macro to BlueZone and if they don’t, you can still get at your data. If you need help with that let me know.

Start Collecting Your Dealership’s Data So You Can Understand & Improve Your Store’s Results – Reposted

This is a re-post of my post on ADP (CDK Global) Expertise today.

What I am about to explain to you will change your life if you are at all frustrated with your store’s performance?

It may sound strange but usually performance issues arise from a lack of feedback to the workgroups contained within your operations. I use the term workgroups because there are numerous groups of employees in your dealership that need feedback to perform optimally. These groups of employees (workgroups) include:

  • An Individual
  • A Team – (usually front end sales teams but this can include techs and other employees).
  • A Department
  • A Store
  • Same stores – a workgroup important for comparing Year over Year (YoY) results.
  • A Division – ( a group of stores by franchise or geographical location)
  • A Region – ( usually geographical)
  • A Country (if you have stores in different countries)

How would you like to improve the profitability of all your store or stores right now?

We will need to use your data from your DMS (Dealership Management System) extracted properly for analysis and presented in a way that ranks your workgroups. The following SharePoint Online interactive report has a tab that ranks the performance of two workgroups; stores and individual F&I Managers:

capture

The premier business data presentation platform, SharePoint Online, is free with the Enterprise Office 365 subscriptions. With SharePoint Online you can control who is able to see each individual report based on their logon. Those who don’t have permission will not even see the report link on the site.

Feedback is extremely important if you want your employees to improve. If your employees don’t get feedback they will either:

  • Get the data on their own or ask for it or,
  • Just maintain the status quo (under-performing) or,
  • In all cases, leave your employ.

The sad part is, the good ones leave (because they are not recognized) along with the not-so-good (because they are not motivated).

We need to take advantage of a person’s or workgroup’s natural competitive instincts!

Critical to reaping the performance improvement that feedback can create is ranking the workgroups. Feedback can also be fine using objectives but that doesn’t get the competitive juices flowing. We have to rank them!

In my experience, when you rank workgroups they all rise, even the bottom individual or workgroup. That’s because everyone wants (on some level) to do good.

There are three steps to making this happen:

  1. Automate the Collection of the Data.
  2. Train your CFO and Controllers on how to use the latest tools to analyze the data efficiently
  3. Train your CFO and Controllers on how to create reports with the latest tools and publish them to SharePoint and Office365.

I have a lot of experience with CDK, InfinitiNet and DealerTrack and so that is what I will stick with here. You can access your data on these platforms but I am not so sure about Reynolds anymore.

Step 1:

To automate the collection of your data all you really need is an ODBC connection, some knowledge of the DMS data model and a subscription to Microsoft Azure. You would then ask someone like me to write a PowerShell script to run on your server to extract the data from the DMS at least daily and move it to a SQL Azure database (or on-premise).

You can skip this step if you are on CDK and you have signed up for their wonderful MDA (Managed Data Access) or DDA (Dealer Data Access) product. Those products serve up daily refreshes of data on a PostgreSQL database on your CDK server already.

Step 2:

CFOs and Controllers and even advanced Business Managers are the ones to analyze the data and create the reports. They need training and I will be setting up some courses here in Las Vegas to train them. I don’t advocate having IT people do this because they just don’t have the knowledge of how these numbers are generated; where they come from and how they inter-relate. So they need training in:

  • The DMS data model i.e., where the data resides and what transactions put it there.
  • How to use Excel 2013 and 2016 with PowerPivot and PowerQuery and other tools to create interactive reports so they refresh automatically when the underlying data is updated. You don’t want a set of gorgeous reports that require your people to manually update them. We will let SharePoint Online handle that.

Step 3:

Because this data is confidential and because we need to make sure it is correct this step also falls on the responsibility of the financial side of the business. I recommend this be handled by the CFO, Controller and/or Business Manager. In larger dealer groups the CFO or Controller can hire someone with this expertise but they need to understand car dealership transactions and accounting. There are two kinds of reporting in the dealership ( I teach all the competencies needed for both):

  1. Permanent periodic reports. These include rankings, Over-Age Inventory, Heat sheets, A/R Aging, CIT, Incentives, Upcoming Lease Terminations Reporting etc. These reports need to be built once and automated by reporting in their own SharePoint page with automatic refresh with proper permissions.
  2. Ad-Hoc reports. These are reports that you need to create one time or on-the-fly to do analytics prior to making a major business decision. In either case properly trained financial people need to prepare them.

I will be sending out an email announcing a seminar in the spring to lay this out for Dealers, CFOs and Controllers in detail. If you want to be on the list you can email me at jdonnelly at jdonnelly dot com or give me a call at 702.498.8777

PowerShell Cmdlets for Auto Dealerships

I am getting more and more calls for help with CDK Global, DealerTrack, and InfinitiNet data extraction and I want to post now about how I can help best:

  • I will write you a PowerShell cmdlet that will exactly meet your needs

I find the Microsoft PowerShell platform the best for folks that are not technically adept to extract data when, where and as often as they want. It helps to know how to run a PowerShell cmdlet but that is not critical. I can get you up and running with a 15 minute phone call.

The beauty of PowerShell is that I can write you a cmdlet to do whatever it is you want done. We then import those into your PowerShell ISE and then you can run it with different parameters as often as you want. The output you get back can be opened directly in Excel (if that is how you want it) by PowerShell. I can even write the cmdlet so that it emails the information around or in many other ways.

The reason I like PowerShell is because running the report is easy for those who don’t know PowerShell and yet I can make PowerShell do pretty much anything you need.

I will write your custom cmdlet quickly and for a fixed fee because, not only am I adept at writing PowerShell cmdlets and modules, but I know DMS data models very well.

I would estimate that most extraction cmdlets will be quoted in the $150 to $350 range but if you want a cmdlet to not only extract the data but send email reports or marketing it could (depending on how elaborate) cost upwards of $1,000 – $2,000.

Monthly support for the first 3 cmdlets is free and add $100 a month for each batch of 3 thereafter.

Email me now for a quote at jdonnelly at jdonnelly.com

 

Generating ADP (CDK Global) Accounting Schedules in Excel PowerPivot – Part III

The last post entitled Generating ADP (CDK Global) Accounting Schedules in Excel PowerPivot – Part II wrapped up derivation of the SQL statement that we need to use to create the perfect workbook for presenting accounting schedules in Excel using PowerPivot. Continuing to fine tune our project, I made some changes to Part I and Part II so be sure and copy the new SQL statements if you have been following along.

Today we create the PivotTable in a workbook and next time in Part IV I will show you in a video how to customize and use it effectively.

The final version of the query (we created last time) we will use is as follows:

SELECT a.cora_acct_code, a.hostitemid, a.accountnumber, g.accountdescription, a.companyid, c.journalid, c.refer, a.control, c.accountingdate, c.controltype, c.control2, c.controltype2, c.detaildescription, c.postingamount, c.postingsequence, c.postingtime, a.currentmonth, a.dateofoldestscheditem, a.schedulenumber, b.sequenceno
FROM ed.glschedule_v a
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulexref_v b ON (a.cora_acct_code = b.cora_acct_code AND a.schedulenumber::text = b.schedulenumber::text AND a.accountnumber::text = b.accountnumber::text AND a.control::text = b.control::text AND a.currentmonth = b.currentmonth)
INNER JOIN ed.gljedetail_v c ON (b.dtlcompanyid = c.companyid AND b.dtlaccountingdate = c.accountingdate AND b.accountnumber = c.accountnumber AND b.dtljournalid = c.journalid AND b.dtlpostingsequence = c.postingsequence AND b.dtlpostingtime = c.postingtime AND b.dtlrefer = c.refer AND b.control = c.control)
INNER JOIN ed.glcoa_v g ON (a.cora_acct_code = g.cora_acct_code AND a.accountnumber = g.accountnumber)
WHERE a.currentmonth={ts '2014-12-01 12:00:00 AM'} AND a.cora_acct_code  In ('XXXX-A','YYYY-A','ZZZZ-A')
UNION
SELECT d.cora_acct_code, d.hostitemid, d.accountnumber, h.accountdescription, d.companyid, e.journalid, e.refer, d.control, e.accountingdate, e.controltype, e.control2, e.controltype2, e.detaildescription, e.postingamount, e.postingsequence, e.postingtime, d.currentmonth, d.dateofoldestscheditem, d.schedulenumber, f.sequenceno 
FROM ed.glschedule_v d
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulexrefbalfwd_v f ON (d.cora_acct_code = f.cora_acct_code AND d.schedulenumber::text = f.schedulenumber::text AND d.accountnumber::text = f.accountnumber::text AND d.control::text = f.control::text AND d.currentmonth = f.currentmonth)
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulebalfwddetail_v e ON (f.dtlcompanyid = e.companyid AND f.dtlaccountingdate = e.accountingdate AND f.accountnumber = e.accountnumber AND f.dtljournalid = e.journalid AND f.dtlpostingsequence = e.postingsequence AND f.dtlpostingtime = e.postingtime AND f.dtlrefer = e.refer AND f.schedulenumber::text = e.schedulenumber::text AND f.currentmonth = e.currentmonth AND f.control = e.control)
INNER JOIN ed.glcoa_v h ON (d.cora_acct_code = h.cora_acct_code AND d.accountnumber = h.accountnumber)
WHERE d.currentmonth={ts '2014-12-01 12:00:00 AM'} AND d.cora_acct_code In ('XXXX-A','YYYY-A','ZZZZ-A')

Notice that I do not include a JOIN with the glschedulesetup_v view because I know that the dealerships whose data I am using in this example do not have single account schedules for all the accounts I may be interested in viewing.

In order to work through this exercise you must have PowerPivot enabled in Excel 2013. It may work with PowerPivot in Excel 2010 but I have not tried it. Once you open Excel and open a blank workbook click on the POWERPIVOT tab as shown below:

Excel 2013 Ribbon POWERPIVOT tab
Excel 2013 Ribbon with POWERPIVOT tab selected (click to enlarge)

In the Data Model section of the POWERPIVOT ribbon click on Manage which will open up POWERPIVOT as follows:

PowerPivot Data Model Manage Ribbon
PowerPivot Data Model Manage Ribbon (click to enlarge)

So in order to add a table to the data model we will us an existing connection to the Managed Data Access server located at your dealerships CDK Global Drive IP address. If you need to create a connection, CDK will be happy to walk you through installing the npgsql OLEDB or  pgsql ODBC drivers etc. In this post I am assuming the adp_report database already has a connection setup on your PC.

To add a table to your data model containing the schedule detail we need, click on Existing Connections in the Get External Data section of the ribbon presented in the Home tab of POWERPIVOT. It will look like this:

"Select an Existing Connection" dialog
The “Select an Existing Connection” dialog box (click to enlarge)

Make sure the adp_report connection has been highlighted in blue and click on the Open button at the bottom which will take you to the first page of the Table Import Wizard like so:

Choose How to Import
Table Import Wizard (click to enlarge)

You could explore all the views available on adp_report by selecting the first item but since we already know what we want and have the SQL statement already built we will select the option to “Write a query that will specify the table to import” which then takes you to the next dialog of the Table Import Wizard as follows:

Specify a SQL Query
Specify a SQL Query (click to enlarge)

Next you change the query name and paste in our query in the large box and click on Validate and you will see that the query validates like so:

SQL Query Validated
Specify a SQL Query -Validated (click to enlarge)

You then click on the Finish button and the query runs and the table is imported like so:

Importing Data
Importing Data (click to enlarge)

The query ran for approximately 20 minutes for two dealerships, one very large and one medium size. When it is done the Table Import Wizard will report Success and tell you the total number of rows imported (in this case 108,071 rows were imported):

Success
Success (click to enlarge)

So now you will see the schedule detail show up in a tab in PowerPivot. The tab will have the same name as the query which will be in this case, Schedule_Query_40. I have renamed it ScheduleDetail (you can rename tables by right clicking on the tab and selecting Rename). Next you will need to click on PivotTable (which PowerPivot will then create in Excel) on the Home ribbon in PowerPivot like so:

Create PivotTable in PowerPivot
Create PivotTable selection in PowerPivot (click to enlarge)

Excel will then exit the Manage window and open the workbook window and will ask you where you want to place the new PivotTable:

Create PivotTable
Create PivotTable (click to enlarge)

Here you should place the PivotTable on a new sheet as we will build an interactive environment around the PivotTable using slicers. After you click OK the sheet with the empty PivotTable on it should look like this:

Empty PivotTable
Empty PivotTable (click to enlarge)

Now that we have a PivotTable there are many useful ways to build your interactive accounting schedules. The best way to show you the possibilities is to continue the process in Part IV utilizing video.

Stay tuned.

Generating ADP (CDK Global) Accounting Schedules in Excel PowerPivot – Part II

The last post on Generating ADP (CDK Global) Accounting Schedules in Excel PowerPivot – Part I had a lot of information in it and I spent some time this week working on the perfect workbook setup to present the schedules to the end user. As a result, I made some changes to Part I relative to the use of the glschedulesetup_v view.

To begin with, the first dealership whose data I worked with violated one of my assumptions that all scheduled accounts would have at least one schedule setup with only that account on it. That is, the account would appear in a schedule by itself. Since this wasn’t the case, I quickly made some changes to the post.

I left the JOIN of the glschedulesetup_v view in the SQL query with the caveat that:

We are making a large assumption here though; that the dealership has single account schedules for all scheduled accounts. If not, we won’t want to JOIN the glschedulesetup_v view at all. In that case, we will deal with duplications with our slicers in the resulting pivot table.

Well for my work this week, I ended up eliminating the JOIN of the glschedulesetup_v entirely because it didn’t help and, as I will show you, restricting the pivot table to one set of schedule transactions per account is fairly straight forward with the use of slicers.

Another change I made to the original post was in an attempt to optimize the query. Using the EXPLAIN function in PostgresQL I determined that the cost of running a query with a LEFT OUTER JOIN versus an INNER JOIN between the glschedulexref_v view the gljedetail_v view was significant. I thought about it a bit and realized that by definition there had to be a one-to-one relationship between the cross reference entry and the GL detail entry in order for the report to actually be a schedule. We will test this however, to make sure.

So for these reasons, the query implementing the accounting schedule data connection on PowerPivot was reduced to the following:

SELECT a.cora_acct_code, a.hostitemid, a.accountnumber, g.accountdescription, a.companyid, c.journalid, c.refer, a.control, c.accountingdate, c.controltype, c.control2, c.controltype2, c.detaildescription, c.postingamount, c.postingsequence, c.postingtime, a.currentmonth, a.dateofoldestscheditem, a.schedulenumber, b.sequenceno
FROM ed.glschedule_v a
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulexref_v b ON (a.cora_acct_code = b.cora_acct_code AND a.schedulenumber::text = b.schedulenumber::text AND a.accountnumber::text = b.accountnumber::text AND a.control::text = b.control::text AND a.currentmonth = b.currentmonth)
INNER JOIN ed.gljedetail_v c ON (b.dtlcompanyid = c.companyid AND b.dtlaccountingdate = c.accountingdate AND b.accountnumber = c.accountnumber AND b.dtljournalid = c.journalid AND b.dtlpostingsequence = c.postingsequence AND b.dtlpostingtime = c.postingtime AND b.dtlrefer = c.refer AND b.control = c.control)
INNER JOIN ed.glcoa_v g ON (a.cora_acct_code = g.cora_acct_code AND a.accountnumber = g.accountnumber)
WHERE a.currentmonth={ts '2014-11-01 12:00:00 AM'} AND a.cora_acct_code 'XXX-A'

In my experimentation this week I was pleasantly surprised at how wonderful this solution really is. With PowerPivot we can join all kinds of data tables to our schedules to augment the information presented with names, phone numbers on receivable schedules, employees, vehicle details etc. In my final workbook I added queries to pull A/R customer data, employee data, vendor data, car deal data and vehicle inventory data. I made special sheets containing pivot tables for vehicle inventory related accounts and car deal related accounts. It made the accounting schedule review process so much more productive.

We can now move on to the second part of this series where we expand the query to handle “Balance Forward” schedules.

In order to accommodate “Balance Forward” schedules we have to add all the “Balance Forward” detail to the schedule detail table created using the above MDA query. This “Balance Forward” detail is maintained in these two views:

  • glschedulexrefbalfwd_v
  • glschedulebalfwddetail_v

which are analogous to these two views for “Detail Forward” schedules:

  • glschedulexref_v
  • gljedetail_v

To do this, we simply UNION it in. We copy the SELECT statement we made in the last post (above) and paste it again at the end of the first one and insert the word UNION between them. We then change the “Detail Forward” tables in the SELECT statement after the UNION to the “Balance Forward” tables and change the aliases so they don’t conflict (pardon the reversal of e and f) . The result is:

SELECT a.cora_acct_code, a.hostitemid, a.accountnumber, g.accountdescription, a.companyid, c.journalid, c.refer, a.control, c.accountingdate, c.controltype, c.control2, c.controltype2, c.detaildescription, c.postingamount, c.postingsequence, c.postingtime, a.currentmonth, a.dateofoldestscheditem, a.schedulenumber, b.sequenceno
FROM ed.glschedule_v a
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulexref_v b ON (a.cora_acct_code = b.cora_acct_code AND a.schedulenumber::text = b.schedulenumber::text AND a.accountnumber::text = b.accountnumber::text AND a.control::text = b.control::text AND a.currentmonth = b.currentmonth)
INNER JOIN ed.gljedetail_v c ON (b.dtlcompanyid = c.companyid AND b.dtlaccountingdate = c.accountingdate AND b.accountnumber = c.accountnumber AND b.dtljournalid = c.journalid AND b.dtlpostingsequence = c.postingsequence AND b.dtlpostingtime = c.postingtime AND b.dtlrefer = c.refer AND b.control = c.control)
INNER JOIN ed.glcoa_v g ON (a.cora_acct_code = g.cora_acct_code AND a.accountnumber = g.accountnumber)
WHERE a.currentmonth={ts '2014-11-01 12:00:00 AM'} AND a.cora_acct_code  In ('XXX-A')
UNION
SELECT d.cora_acct_code, d.hostitemid, d.accountnumber, h.accountdescription, d.companyid, e.journalid, e.refer, d.control, e.accountingdate, e.controltype, e.control2, e.controltype2, e.detaildescription, e.postingamount, e.postingsequence, e.postingtime, d.currentmonth, d.dateofoldestscheditem, d.schedulenumber, f.sequenceno 
FROM ed.glschedule_v d
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulexrefbalfwd_v f ON (d.cora_acct_code = f.cora_acct_code AND d.schedulenumber::text = f.schedulenumber::text AND d.accountnumber::text = f.accountnumber::text AND d.control::text = f.control::text AND d.currentmonth = f.currentmonth)
INNER JOIN ed.glschedulebalfwddetail_v e ON (f.dtlcompanyid = e.companyid AND f.dtlaccountingdate = e.accountingdate AND f.accountnumber = e.accountnumber AND f.dtljournalid = e.journalid AND f.dtlpostingsequence = e.postingsequence AND f.dtlpostingtime = e.postingtime AND f.dtlrefer = e.refer AND f.schedulenumber::text = e.schedulenumber::text AND f.currentmonth = e.currentmonth AND f.control = e.control)
INNER JOIN ed.glcoa_v h ON (d.cora_acct_code = h.cora_acct_code AND d.accountnumber = h.accountnumber)
WHERE d.currentmonth={ts '2014-11-01 12:00:00 AM'} AND d.cora_acct_code In ('XXX-A')

It should be noted at this point that this query takes a considerable amount of time. I needed to review the accounting schedules on 7 dealerships this week so in my WHERE clause I used a.cora_acct_code In (‘XXX1-A’,’XXX2-A’,’XXX3-A’,’XXX4-A’,’XXX5-A’,’XXX6-A’,’XXX7-A’).  To run the query on the seven dealerships it took about an hour. That’s quick compared to the queries I tested earlier using LEFT OUTER JOIN. For the 7 stores it returned 195,000 rows.

In the next post in the series I will add some other tables to the PowerPivot data model and we will build some pivot tables to present the schedules.

Stay tuned.

Converting to Outside Payroll

Got a call from a programmer who was helping a company convert a 5-store auto dealership company from Reynolds and Reynolds in-house payroll to an outside payroll service. The payroll company I had never heard of but they were very astute and specialized from what I could tell.

The impetus for the change seemed to be a time and attendance software vendor who appeared to use this payroll service company to to produce the payroll using data from his system. It could have been the other way around, the payroll company offered the Time and Attendance software as an important part of their service. I did not get a demo of the Time and Attendance system but the installer and I shared a remote PC connection and it seemed very comprehensive. Time and Attendance systems, if properly setup and managed (the critical part), saves dealerships money; serious money.

So the programmer who contacted me needed help extracting check history and YTD balance data from the Reynolds system. The programmer, Jim Barbour of Sequencing, Inc. was very professional and managed the project very well. Jim needed me to pull all check history as well as pay, tax and deduction year to date totals for the employees. I gave him a quote that made sense and I went to work. I was successful pulling what I thought was all the data and I forwarded a file for his review. Upon verification by the client it was determined that we did not have it all. In particular there were a few deduction items on a several employees that were unaccounted for. Having experience with Reynolds file structures, I planned for this possibility and I had built time in for the possibility that we might need to do extra digging for the odd item. I found the offending miscellaneous deduction codes and related year-to-date totals buried in a multi-valued field called “I/D”. I extracted that data which was tricky because I wanted my condition statement to filter for only those values I was looking for in the multi-valued field. It didn’t work that way. Depending on the field attributes one may have to grab it all and filter programmatically. All was well although the flat file output was rather ugly. Jim being a good sport was able to select for and import the few codes into his conversion.

The interesting thing about this conversion was that the client needed an export for tech hours flagged to go each payday to the service bureau (old term I know, I did payroll in the early 80’s on IBM 360’s for a service bureau subsequently purchased by ADP called Stat-Tab……I was the payroll manager!)  I wrote the export query and it worked out well however the concern on the client’s side was how to make sure the technician’s flags (time entries) are only paid once in cases where the flags are adjusted or if the RO is re-opened and closed again (as in possibly a warranty ticket). The answer was two-fold; one was to isolate flags by the Work Date field (in the query) rather than the RO date or any other date field. Work Date is the date the time entry is actually written, not the date the work is done or the RO was finished or closed. If we stick with the Work Date condition, during the pay cycle only those flags or adjustments done during the cycle get paid regardless of what goes on with the RO. In addition, the client had Body Shops and they wanted to pay flags (time) on ROs as the job was progressing regardless of whether or not the RO was closed in the pay cycle. Using Work Date allowed them to pay on work in progress as well.

The 2nd step in the process from the dealership’s side (I am an accountant, CPA actually but not current on my license) was to schedule the Work In Process – Labor (WIP) general ledger asset account (usually 247) by RO number. Many dealerships do this to control flagging irregularities and I believe the client had these schedules already in place. However, they became extremely important under the new outside payroll processing system. On the credit side of the of the WIP account will be the ROs total of cost of labor, i.e., all tech flags in total costed out on the RO when it was closed. On the debit side will be all the individual flags paid against that RO’s total costed labor. The RO control subtotal should always zero after closing the RO and the subsequent payroll is applied. The office, payroll clerk or office manager, must monitor the schedule often at the start of outside processing and every pay cycle thereafter for problems or irregularities. Techs are smart and some are inclined to “game” the system. Researching ROs with balances and resolving with either a back flag (a charge-back) or a correction to the RO cost and/or costing procedure is imperative so it doesn’t happen again.

All in all a workable solution for those who want to take time and attendance and payroll to the next step in these automobile dealership systems.